Events

Webinar | Why the Australian sulphur-crested cockatoo is royalty in the bush

Published 8th April 21 12:00 AM
This webinar will take the audience through a range of cross-disciplinary findings and my own research, from the origins of cockatoos and the remarkable evolutionary outcomes, be this in terms of their environmental adaptations, social attributes, reproduction, personality, and cognition.

Cockatoos have had a very chequered history in their contacts with humans. Of late, some alarming concerns for Australian birdlife have led one to suspect that we will face massive and sudden declines of bird numbers and even of species unless changes are implemented to halt or reverse our treatment of and actions against the environment. Cockatoos are high on that list as parrots are worldwide--a third of all parrots are on the endangered list and there are many sound reasons why we should and can prevent this from happening.


Meet the Speaker


Gisela Kaplan is Emeritus professor in animal behaviour at the University of New England, Armidale. Gisela holds 3 doctorates (2 PhDs and a lifetime achievement award of an honorary Doctor of Science), has written 23 books and produced over 250 research articles and essays, earning various awards and international acclaim. Her interests are driven by her enduring fascination with and concern for Australian native birds and her ongoing role in saving and rehabilitating birds in her spare time. Click here to read Gisela Kaplan's bio >

This webinar will run on Australian Eastern Standard Time (AEST). This webinar will be recorded and a link to access the recording will be sent to all registered attendees at the conclusion of the webinar.

CPD Points

Event details

When: 6 May 2021
1:00 PM - 2:00 PM

Where: Webinar

Cost: $10 EIANZ Members, $20 Non-members

Registrations Open: 8th April 21 10:00 AM

Registrations Close: 6th May 21 11:30 AM

Contact: Enquiries via +61 3 8593 4140 or office@eianz.org

Register now and secure your attendance









Published 8th April 21 12:00 AM